Do you plan to donate your body when you die?

If so, you might think twice about that.

First of all, your organs may be “harvested” before you’re dead.

The Disputed Death of an Eight-Year-Old Whose Organs Were Donated

Furthermore, there’s BIG MONEY in body parts.

In the rush to harvest body parts, death investigations have been upended

Soylent Green anyone?

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7 Responses to Do you plan to donate your body when you die?

  1. TurtleTurtle says:

    I have a genetic eye disorder which will require me to have cornea transplants or go totally blind. At this point, it is a slow cell death and quiet loss of vision. Knowing what I now know about organ trafficking, how can I consent to that option?
    We each must face what is real and true and face our moral dilemmas as they come. It is a mistake to believe that these revelations are all a ‘social justice’ issue. We are each accountable for our choices and the moral integrity with which we choose to live. That is the gut of personal responsibility and the true ground of freedom. Heaven help us all.

    • Good news for you: eye disorders and visual issues are among the most responsive to metaphysical healing. I’ve known people who went from legally blind to 20/20 eyesight in under two weeks. Others I know have reversed macular degeneration, binocular dysfunction, and cataracts. It doesn’t always work, but it can be done — especially if you really object to the alternatives.

      “We are each accountable for our choices and the moral integrity with which we choose to live. That is the gut of personal responsibility and the true ground of freedom. Heaven help us all.” Agreed! But “heaven” does help. 🙂

    • Rachael Carlson says:

      May you find a solution that is perfect and true for you.

  2. We signed on with a company years ago and on the donation card it reads that death
    must be confirmed by proper authorities and once death is pronounced, to call their
    number (on the card). Not to call a funeral home. I know body parts are valuable; but
    if they will pick up our old carcasses that’s ok. I guess and save the cost of paying for
    the funeral home racket.

  3. Rachael Carlson says:

    Coming at this issue from a very oblique angle, and with a full understanding of anyone’s skepticism: Several years ago I had a dental bone graft to anchor a later implant. The first night, and every night for several weeks until I had the tissue removed, my dreams were filled with the very clear, specific life experience of a particular man. I know where he lived, what he did for a living; I know his family members and listened in on conversations. Fortunately, he was a good guy, but it was literally like having two people living in my body. I don’t know what that would have meant for him, but I can say that I had the organ donor designation removed from my driver’s license. I feel badly about that choice in many ways, but in the end, I find that my commitment to the intactness of the soul’s energy trumps everything else. This is not a point I would argue or proselytize about, but one that feels solidly true for me.

  4. rose day says:

    Ann, I share the following as additional information regarding organ transplantation
    as it seems that optimum transplantation depends on what is termed a ‘still-beating heart’ . . . more important even than brain activity.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beating_heart_cadaver

    Information presently available regarding trafficking of children for organs has pushed the organ donor paradigm into an entirely new level because it stands to reason that donor programs that depend upon trafficked children would by the very nature of the endeavor not necessarily focus upon the well-being of the donor in the transplantation process.

    Humanity seems truly upon a precipice in terms of care for one another.

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