Exopermaculture Op-Ed #2: On Daily News, on Patterns in History

Note: Here’s Exopermaculture Op-Ed #1.

Faded patterns in concrete

Faded patterns in concrete

As each day’s MSM and/or alternative “headlines” gallop across my brain, I’m reminded to keep context in mind and heart. Indeed, to recognize that all headlines emerge from context, and that context, itself, may be, at the quantum level, indeterminate. I.e., it may be that nobody really knows the full measure of what’s going on. Here are three men, however, who more or less, want to think they do. Each aims to identify, describe, and even predict the future nature and direction — of collective currents that appear to move — unceasing and uncaring — below the surface headline froth.

Let me state at the outside, that I very much admire each one’s masterful style of articulation, his unusual capacity to recognize drama without identifying with any of the players, and his sincere, single-minded attempt to actually put his finger on the pulse of history. In their own ways, each one helps me to rear back from my own always-way-too- simple-minded projections and to play with multiple possible layers of meaning.

The first two approaches are biased in terms of a deterministic march to history, and seem to be squeezing MSM news events into variations of the Hegelian “thesis, antithesis, synthesis” pattern, now popularized by David Icke as “problem, reaction, solution.”

J.C. Collins of www.philosophyofmetrics

and

“Ken” of www.redefininggod.com

A third seems, in my view, to be equally deterministic, though with a greater sweep to his perspective of patterns, modeling his reflections on Arnold Toynbee’s description and assessment of the rise and fall of civilizations.

John Michael Greer: thearchdruidreport.com

Meanwhile, I can’t help but think that, however “right” each of them wants to be, that they all rise and fall according to their limited views of the (likely) unlimited context in which we all live and move and have our being. And so, while it helps me — provokes me! — to read — and admire! — each of them once in a while, I attempt to remain conscious enough meanwhile so that I do not crystalize whatever I find there — or anywhere else — into a set of (“true,” “certain” “absolute”) beliefs. For, at least for me —

any attempt to stop the flow,

to make it make sense,

to (pretend to) limit

the infinite creativity of the universe

feels,

frankly,

foolish.

Night sky, seen through telescope

Night sky, seen through telescope

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