Who are these people? How can we learn from them? Or is it too late for them. For us.

I sit here, still reeling from Carolyn Baker’s post, adding poignancy to this exquisitely beautiful set of 46 photos, an “irreplaceable ethnographic record of a fast disappearing world.”

Stunning Portraits of the World’s Remotest Tribes, Before They Pass Away

November 6, 2013

boredpanda.com, via niece Megan

Spending 2 weeks in each tribe, photographer Jimmy Nelson became acquainted with their time-honoured traditions, joined their rituals and captured it all in a very appealing way. His detailed photographs showcase unique jewelry, hairstyles and clothing, not to forget the surroundings and cultural elements most important to each tribe, like horses for Gauchos. According to Nelson, his mission was to assure that the world never forgets how things used to be: “Most importantly, I wanted to create an ambitious aesthetic photographic document that would stand the test of time. A body of work that would be an irreplaceable ethnographic record of a fast disappearing world.”

All of his snapshots now lie in a massive book and will be extended by a film (you can see a short introduction video below). So embark on a journey to the most remote corners and meet the witnesses of a disappearing world. Would you give up your smartphone, internet and TV to live free like them?

Source: beforethey.com Book: Amazon.com

A.K.: Here’s one of the 46 portraits. This beautiful man’s eyes remind me of the open sky. He’s a member of the Nenets tribe, Nenets, Russia, located on the Yamal Peninsula, in the West Siberian North.

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