Alex Jones: "Seal Team 6 Crash was an inside job." True?

The minute I read about this Navy Seal tragedy, I had a gut response: this was an inside job, related to the OBL “death” scenario, as in “dead men don’t talk.” Or am I suffering from PTSD due to all the awful stuff going on and so jumpy and startle easily at any perceived “coincidence” that seems part of a pattern?

Alex Jones agrees with my gut, says he predicted the Seal team’s demise in advance, and that this situation “stinks to high heaven.” Another infowars.com writer, Madison Ruppert, also wonders about the coincidences, but refuses to jump to conclusions.

Thanks to beforeitsnews.com for both these stories.

Questions Raised By The SEAL Team 6 Deaths In Afghanistan

by Madison Ruppert

August 7, 2011 3:01

In the deadliest day of the almost decade-long war in Afghanistan roughly 30 members of the American Special Forces, most of which belonged to the Navy’s SEAL Team 6, were killed in a Taliban rocket attack.

A total of 38 people were killed in the crash, including 7 Afghans and an interpreter. However, it is being reported that none of the SEALs killed were part of the SEAL Team 6 operation that resulted in the execution of Osama bin Laden.

Due to this fact, I think that much of the jumping to conclusions on this issue is unwarranted at this stage.

It took minutes before the Internet was ablaze with chatter about the deaths of these American commandos. Much of the speculation surrounding this was because of the assumption that some of the SEALs were involved in the Osama bin Laden capture/kill charade.

Of course the conjecture was that these SEALs were killed to keep them quiet about their involvement in killing (or not killing) Osama bin Laden.

Without a single confirmation that even one of the team members was involved in the raid itself, I am not comfortable making this statement.

That being said, there are some points in this story that raise some red flags for me. None of these are conclusive and with so little information about the actual individuals killed in the crash, I do not believe that we should come to any concrete conclusions just yet.

This is very much like my analysis in the wake of the Breivik terrorist attacks in Norway: I caution the reader to take note that I am mulling over what we know now to give you the analysis I can present at the moment.

This is very likely to change in the coming days and weeks, but I think it is one of the primary duties of the alternative media to start drawing connections and analyzing events right away in order to spur independent research and investigations. Without pointing out inconsistencies and questioning what we know, we would make no progress towards the truth.

With that disclaimer out of the way, I will raise some questions that I think need to be answered. If you have a military background and can answer any of these questions please do not hesitate to contact me at admin@endthelie.com I would sincerely appreciate your expertise and I will use your comments to publish future articles.

The first odd thing that I noticed about this is that the previous most deadly day in terms of American casualties was also due to a Chinook being shot down near Kabul in 2005. Also on board the previous downed Chinook was a 16-person Special Operations team.

This is the second confirmed enemy attack on an allied helicopter this year. Back in late July, another Chinoook was downed in the Kunar Province, leaving two people injured.

Maybe it is just dumb luck that Taliban insurgents happen to have targeted helicopters loaded to near-full capacity with Special Operations personnel. It seems a bit coincidental that this is the case, especially given the equipment available to U.S. Special Operations teams like the SEAL Team 6.

This raises another question: why were they transporting themselves in a Chinook? Sure, the dual-rotor helicopter has a large carrying capacity, but why would they risk moving an extremely slow, loud transport through the dangerous mountainous areas near Kabul at night in order to engage insurgents?

I find it strange that they would choose to risk all of those valuable Special Operations soldiers’ lives in order to save some gas.

Why would they not utilize the stealth helicopter technology we know for a fact SEAL Team 6 has access to?

Why not use the stealth technology utilized in the original raid on the bin Laden “compound” in Abbottabad, Pakistan?

I fail to see why they would not utilize equipment they are in possession of, especially when it is designed for stealth night raids like the one being conducted that resulted in so many American deaths.

Why would they not make use of the noise reduction and infrared signature reduction technology leveraged in the stealth helicopter design seen in the wreckage after the bin Laden raid?

Maybe I am naïve but I would hope that our military is competent enough to know that taking a slow moving heavy transport through one of the most dangerous regions of Afghanistan at night in order to battle insurgents is not a good idea.

Furthermore, I would hope they realize that loading over 20 Special Operations troops into a single helicopter is not a good idea, evidenced by the massive blow dealt in the 2005 attack that resulted in fewer casualties than the most recent crash.

One problem I have with the idea that this was a deliberate attack in order to cover-up the bin Laden hoax is that it is unlikely that SEAL Team 6 members would suddenly become loose-lipped.

Most of the operations carried out by these covert operations teams, and all Special Forces for that matter, are completely classified. It can be assumed that they have taken out plenty of high-value targets and that they would likely not begin talking about it now.

Some are saying that this attack was used to cover up the deaths of SEALs who were actually killed in the stealth helicopter that was downed near the bin Laden compound. This is just as likely as the notion that they were targeted for their involvement in the bin Laden raid in order to ensure their silence.

I think that the largest red flag raised by the facts currently presented by the mainstream media is that such a large number of the elite SEAL Team 6, officially known as the Navy Special Warfare Development Group, were killed at one time while traveling in the outdated and dangerous Chinook helicopter.

First, why were so many Special Operations soldiers needed to do battle with a handful of Taliban soldiers?

Second, why were they not utilizing the stealth equipment we know they possess? One would assume if they are called the “Special Warfare Development Group” they would be taking advantage of all of the special equipment they are given.

Third, how did the Taliban know to target this helicopter? Is it pure coincidence that the two most deadly attacks in Afghanistan have resulted in large Special Operations casualties?

If you think you can answer any of these questions or would like to give me your two cents, please e-mail me at admin@endthelie.com

Madison Ruppert is the Editor and Owner-Operator of the alternative news and analysis databaseEnd The Lie and has no affiliation with any NGO, political party, economic school, or other organization/cause. If you have questions, comments, or corrections feel free to contact him atadmin@EndtheLie.com


 

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